Personal tools
You are here: Home » News » What's new » Moving beyond benefit–cost analysis of climate change
INSAM Navigation
 

Moving beyond benefit–cost analysis of climate change

Last modified December 23, 2013 10:00

Jonathan Koomey 2013 Environ. Res. Lett. 8 041005 doi:10.1088/1748-9326/8/4/041005

Environmental Research Letters Volume 8 Number 4

Jonathan Koomey 2013 Environ. Res. Lett. 8 041005 doi:10.1088/1748-9326/8/4/041005

Moving beyond benefit–cost analysis of climate change

OPEN ACCESS

Jonathan Koomey

jgkoomey@stanford.edu

Steyer-Taylor Center for Energy Policy and Finance, Stanford University, USA

Results for citeulike are currently unavailable for this article.

Results for Mendeley are currently unavailable for this article.

Results for Connotea are currently unavailable for this article.

 

Perspective

The conventional benefit–cost approach to understanding the climate problem has serious limitations. Fortunately, an alternative way of thinking about the problem has arisen in recent decades, based on analyzing the cost effectiveness of achieving a normatively defined warming target. This approach yields important insights, showing that delaying action is costly, required emissions reductions are rapid, and most proved reserves of fossil fuels will need to stay in the ground if we're to stabilize the climate. I call this method 'working forward toward a goal', and it is one that will see wide application in the years ahead.

 

Document Actions
  • Share on Facebook
  • Print this