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Accounts of Operational Agrometeorology

Last modified September 26, 2008 09:25

Here we publish short accounts on successful operational applications and services in agrometeorology (public (e.g. NMHSs) and private), as well as on action support systems (data, research, policies, extension), that are suitable for further dissemination, or on publications that are holding such accounts. [Discuss items for this section with the President or the Vice-president.]

One Size Fits None: Drought forecasting in the Caribbean — Last modified June 23, 2015 08:54
A summary of the first-ever dry season Caribbean Climate Outlook Forum. By Elisabeth Gawthrop
Rubber prices bounce back as late rains, rising temperature hit output — Last modified June 15, 2015 10:18
Business Standard. New Delhi, 10 June 2015
Rising Mercury, Untimely Rain Impact Tea Production in Kerala — Last modified June 15, 2015 10:17
The New Indian Express. Chennai, 9 June 2015
Monsoon might hit Kerala in 48 hours: IMD — Last modified June 08, 2015 16:21
Business Standard. New Delhi, 5 June 2015
Global warming affecting rubber output’ — Last modified June 08, 2015 16:20
Business Line. New Delhi, 5 June 2015
Enough foodgrain stocks to tide over any shortfall in rain: Jaitley — Last modified June 08, 2015 16:20
Business Line. New Delhi, 5 June 2015
Agri commodities' price rise on deficient monsoon forecast — Last modified June 08, 2015 16:18
Business Standard. New Delhi, 5 June 2015
Cotton acreage to bloom on drought — Last modified June 08, 2015 16:17
Business Line. New Delhi, 5 June 2015
Increased atmospheric carbon dioxide makes trees use water more efficiently — Last modified June 08, 2015 16:11
The increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration has allowed trees across Europe to use their available water resources more efficiently, new research has shown.
How much drought can a tree take? — Last modified June 08, 2015 15:57
As climate changes and there's more drought, any resulting tree die-off could reduce carbon storage, boosting climate change further. Now, researchers in the US have looked at tree-ring data and climate records, to assess just how much drought today's trees can take.
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