Personal tools
You are here: Home » Topics » History of Agrometeorology » A History of Agrometeorology in I. R. of Iran
INSAM Navigation
 

A History of Agrometeorology in I. R. of Iran

Last modified December 28, 2002 14:44

A review of the approval of the 1970 WMO (World Meteorological Organization) Congress shows that Iran, as a member of this international Organization, committed itself to take action towards establishment of Agrometeorology. Consequently, based on national needs, Iran established in 1975 an Agrometeorological section in the civil Meteorological Organization. For the first time ever in the history of this national Organization, it is taking measures to hold training courses in the field of Agrometeorology. Simultaneously, it is studying, on an expert basis, the entire country in order to identify agricultural regions for the purpose of setting up Agrometeorological stations.

A review of the approval of the 1970 WMO (World Meteorological Organization) Congress shows that Iran, as a member of this international Organization, committed itself to take action towards establishment of Agrometeorology. Consequently, based on national needs, Iran established in 1975 an Agrometeorological section in the civil Meteorological Organization. For the first time ever in the history of this national Organization, it is taking measures to hold training courses in the field of Agrometeorology. Simultaneously, it is studying, on an expert basis, the entire country in order to identify agricultural regions for the purpose of setting up Agrometeorological stations.

Subsequently a manpower training schedule was drawn up and time-tabled programs established for the education of experts and lower personnel needed for 18 Agrometeorological stations. Their headquarter section in the Organization became operational in 1979 under supervision of Iranian and foreign instructors (the so called Kwanta Project). Despite the feasibility of manpower training of this Agrometeorological section, the programs for set up and equipment of stations and establishment of residential regions failed to be carried out in time, due to incorrect implementation. The project came in 1980 across administrative/executive difficulties and obstacles, halfway its completion. About 60% of the personnel of the stations (comprising 18 experts and 36 lower personnel) were suddenly dispatched to the central administration instead of to the stations.

The Meteorological Organization and the Kwanta Project pursued the issues slowly and failed to manage the implementation of training courses. The continuation of the activities of consulting Engineers of the Kwanta Project and Romanian Consulting Engineers were left in suspension and then stopped. Practical training of Agrometeorological personnel of the stations did therefore not take place at all and other defined activities, including theoretical education, were not implemented.

At this juncture, in 1981, the management of the network that had been in charge of running the climatological and pluviometric stations failed to cope with the 18 agrometeorological stations. Many personnel were inevitably dispatched to synoptic stations, for which work they had not been trained. Agrometeorological experts were reduced to the level of very ordinary inspectors.

Under these conditions, in spite of lack of management and official responsibility, but rather on the initiative of the towns concerned and through the personal efforts of experts in Agrometeorology, early stations such as Ekbatan were constructed. Merely out of expert interest and motivation as well as out of individual, moral commitments, some instruments were supplied and research activities started. This way, in 1982 the earliest Agrometeorological research stations were set up in Iran, by energy of many personnel in creating incentives for officials and directors unfamiliar with this field of work.

In 1983, upon arrival of a new Chairman of the Meteorological Organization, there was a turning point in the life and events of the Agrometeorological section. It is after this time that this Unit got the right direction. Some personnel were now dispatched to their regions, after attending short-term and medium-term courses, and some representatives among them attended conferences and international meetings. Working committees and groups were formed. Stations' activity programmes came under supervision of their related central section in the Meteorological Organization. An Agrometeorological section found its identity and Agrometeorological research stations were constructed, one after another, be it at a slow pace.

In June 1988, a seminar on "The role of meteorology in increase of agricultural production" was held at the University of Sari. More than 20 papers were produced by Agrometeorologists and by experts of other fields of the Meteorological Organization and from the famous Mashed University. This marks a climax for the Agrometeorology unit of the Organization up till now.

In 1991, an agreement was signed with the Ministry of Agriculture, that in addition to the 18 initial Kwanta Project stations, 13 new Agrometeorological Stations would be set up in various parts of the country. Thus, the number of Agrometeorological stations reached 31 by the end of the third 5-year development plan of the country.

In September 2001, the first training workshop of Agrometeorology was set up in Hamedan, during which various papers in applied Agrometeorology and other related issues were submitted.

Presently (that is 2002), 28 Agrometeorological stations are actively engaged in research work in Iran.

Future plans are:

  1. Increasing the number of agrometeorological stations in the major agricultural regions.
  2. Improving the number of crops and fruit trees under examination in agrometeorological stations all over Iran.
  3. Providing a concise agrometeorological database, including phenological and climatological data.
  4. Establishing stronger scientific relations between the agrometeorologial department and international organizations.

This "history" was submitted by Mohammad Rahimi, Director of the Agrometeorological Department, I.R. of Iran Meteorological Organization, and edited by Kees Stigter.

Document Actions
  • Share on Facebook
  • Print this