Personal tools
You are here: Home » Topics » Climate change, causes and impacts
INSAM Navigation
 

Climate change, causes and impacts

Last modified December 01, 2011 10:21

Climate change, causes and impacts

Stanford study shows effects of biomass burning on climate, health — Last modified August 17, 2014 16:23
Biomass burning – whether accidental wildfires or deliberate burning of forests to create agricultural lands – has long been known to affect both climate change and public health.
The interaction of climate change, fire, and forests in the U.S. — Last modified August 17, 2014 16:22
A special section of the September issue of Forest Ecology and Management, available online now, assesses the interactions among fire, climate change, and forests for five major regions of the United States.
Water vapour rise is due to man — Last modified August 17, 2014 16:20
Man-made greenhouse gases have increased the amount of water vapour in the upper troposphere, a team from the US has confirmed. The phenomenon could further amplify the effects of climate change, since water vapour also acts as a greenhouse gas.
Climate warming may not drive net losses of soil carbon from tropical forests — Last modified August 13, 2014 12:00
The planet's soil releases about 60 billion tons of carbon into the atmosphere each year, which is far more than that released by burning fossil fuels. This happens through a process called soil respiration. This enormous release of carbon is balanced by carbon coming into the soil system from falling leaves and other plant matter, as well as by the underground activities of plant roots.
Climate change research goes to the extremes — Last modified August 13, 2014 11:59
Climate change research goes to the extremes. By Angela Herring
No hiatus for temperature extremes — Last modified July 31, 2014 14:00
The “hiatus” – a slowdown in the rate of increase of globally averaged annual mean surface temperatures over roughly the last 15 years – attracted a lot of attention around the time of the IPCC’s fifth assessment report. Now a team from Norway, Australia and Canada has found that the trend in extreme, rather than average, temperatures does not show a hiatus.
Complexity and determining dangerous levels of climate impacts — Last modified July 21, 2014 09:11
Chris Huntingford analyses the different responses of water scarcity for humans and water stress for ecosystems as climate changes.
Termites, fungi and climate change — Last modified June 25, 2014 09:23
Climate change models could have a thing or two to learn from termites and fungi, according to a new study released this week.
Water & Climate Risks Facing U.S. Corn Production — Last modified June 23, 2014 14:25
Water & Climate Risks Facing U.S. Corn Production
Saving tropics could cut emissions — Last modified June 23, 2014 14:21
Reducing deforestation in the tropics could cut carbon dioxide emissions by up to one-fifth, a university of Edinburgh study shows.
Babbling brooks adding to climate change? — Last modified June 11, 2014 09:15
Babbling brooks adding to climate change?
Arctic study sheds light on tree-ring divergence problem — Last modified May 27, 2014 09:16
Changes in tree-ring density in the Arctic may be evidence of changes in light intensity during the trees' growth, according to a new study by San Francisco State University researcher Alexander Stine.
The State of Rain — Last modified May 27, 2014 09:13
UCSB's Climate Hazards Group developed a satellite-based rainfall monitoring dataset to support the early detection of drought globally.
Hotspots of climate change impacts in Africa: making sense of uncertainties — Last modified May 16, 2014 08:01
Hotspots of climate change impacts in Africa: making sense of uncertainties
Thawing permafrost releases more methane — Last modified May 13, 2014 20:46
The world’s permafrost contains roughly 227 Gigatonnes of carbon – more than one-third of the current amount of carbon in the atmosphere. As permafrost thaws, the decomposing soil releases greenhouse-gas emissions in the form of methane and carbon dioxide, setting up a positive feedback loop that causes temperatures to rise further and thaw more permafrost.
Arid areas absorb unexpected amounts of carbon — Last modified April 14, 2014 08:55
esearchers led by a Washington State University biologist have found that arid areas, among the biggest ecosystems on the planet, take up an unexpectedly large amount of carbon as levels of carbon dioxide increase in the atmosphere. The findings give scientists a better handle on the earth's carbon budget – how much carbon remains in the atmosphere as CO2, contributing to global warming, and how much gets stored in the land or ocean in other carbon-containing forms.
Heat stress while crops flower could harm yields — Last modified March 31, 2014 15:42
As climate changes, crops that experience high temperatures during their flowering period could set less seed. Indeed, extreme heat stress alone could reduce projected yields of maize by 45% over the next 100 years, according to a team from the UK and Canada.
OU study suggests non-uniform climate warming affects terrestrial carbon cycle, ecosystems and future predictions — Last modified March 13, 2014 09:29
A recent University of Oklahoma study of five decades of satellite data, model simulations and in situ observations suggests the impact of seasonal diurnal or daily warming varies between global regions affecting many ecosystem functions and services, such as food production, carbon sequestration and climate regulation. The effects of non-uniform climate warming on terrestrial ecosystems is a key challenge in carbon cycle research and for those making future predictions.
Volcanoes contribute to recent warming 'hiatus' — Last modified March 07, 2014 12:51
Volcanic eruptions in the early part of the 21st century have cooled the planet, according to a study led by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This cooling partly offset the warming produced by greenhouse gases.
Global warming 'pause' due to unusual trade winds in Pacific ocean, study finds — Last modified February 20, 2014 08:57
The contentious "pause" in global warming over the past decade is largely due to unusually strong trade winds in the Pacific ocean that have buried surface heat deep underwater, new research has found.
Document Actions
  • Share on Facebook
  • RSS feed
  • Print this