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Climate change, causes and impacts

Last modified December 01, 2011 09:21

Climate change, causes and impacts

Climate change could cut West African sorghum yields by a fifth — Last modified December 04, 2014 11:43
In recent decades the Sahel region of West Africa has turned from dusty brown to lush and leafy green. It’s a far cry from the drought conditions that brought famine and crippled the region from the late 1960s to the early 1980s. But the current green and plentiful landscape does not look set to last. A study in Environmental Research Letters (ERL) indicates that by 2060 climate change is likely to cause the Sahel to revert to its dusty state, with droughts equivalent to those experienced in the 1970s.
Climate change set to boost Sumatran wildfires — Last modified December 04, 2014 11:41
October is a worrying month for firefighters on the Indonesian island of Sumatra. As the dry season draws to a close, wildfires spring up all too easily, often resulting in the destruction of vast tracts of rainforest. Now, a study has revealed that climate change is making the problem significantly worse.
Mixed outlook for primary production in warmed climate — Last modified December 04, 2014 10:21
Scientists in the US have predicted that gross primary production – the synthesis of organic compounds, mainly in plant matter, from carbon dioxide – will become limited in a warmed climate, despite having also found that the optimal temperature for the process will rise. According to the researchers, the results highlight the importance of accounting for temperature extremes in climate modelling.
Analysing heat waves – new index allows predicting their magnitude — Last modified November 18, 2014 09:30
Analysing heat waves – new index allows predicting their magnitude
Climate change impacts countered by stricter fisheries management — Last modified November 08, 2014 16:53
A new study has found that implementing stricter fisheries management overcame the expected detrimental effects of climate change disturbances in coral reef fisheries badly impacted by the 1997/98 El Niño, according to the Wildlife Conservation Society.
IPCC releases Synthesis Report for fifth assessment — Last modified November 08, 2014 16:51
The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has released the Synthesis Report for its fifth assessment. The document brings together the findings of the three reports issued during the last 13 months.
Scientists put upper limit on sea-level ris — Last modified November 03, 2014 16:38
This year’s IPCC fifth assessment report put the “likely” – or 66% probability – sea-level rise by 2100 at between 0.29 and 0.98 m. But there is a one in three chance that sea-level rise could be higher than this. Now researchers have examined this upper limit and found there is a 95% chance that sea-level rise this century will be no more than 1.8 m.
How a climate change program is encouraging adoption of research findings — Last modified October 27, 2014 15:25
How a climate change program is encouraging adoption of research findings.
Weather History Time Machine — Last modified October 24, 2014 12:30
During the 1930s, North America endured the Dust Bowl, a prolonged era of dryness that withered crops and dramatically altered where the population settled. Land-based precipitation records from the years leading up to the Dust Bowl are consistent with the telltale drying-out period associated with a persistent dry weather pattern, but they can’t explain why the drought was so pronounced and long-lasting.
Century of northeast Pacific warming due to changing winds — Last modified October 13, 2014 10:16
Much of the sea-surface warming seen around the western coasts of North America since 1900 is due to changes in wind patterns, according to scientists from the US. The team used independent records of sea-surface temperature (SST), surface air temperature and sea-level pressure, an indicator of large-scale wind conditions, to carry out the analysis.
Climate change and storm tracks: a tale of two hemispheres — Last modified October 01, 2014 09:36
Last winter the UK saw exceptional rainfall and flooding, with the wettest December to January period since 1910 and parts of southern England receiving more than 200% of their average monthly rainfall. According to the UK Met Office, the clustering and persistence of the storms that swept in from the Atlantic was highly unusual, carried in on an exceptionally fast and strong jet stream. So is this the kind of winter the UK should come to expect? A new study in Environmental Research Letters (ERL) tries to glimpse the storms of the future.
Global warming slowdown answer lies in depths of Atlantic, study finds — Last modified September 29, 2014 10:31
Excess heat being stored hundreds of metres down in Atlantic and Southern oceans – not Pacific as previously thought
Summer Temperature Trends in India’s Tea-Growing Region — Last modified September 29, 2014 10:30
Climate change in the highlands of India could adversely affect the tea crop
Extreme weather becoming more common, study says — Last modified September 29, 2014 10:15
Extreme weather like the drought currently scorching the western US and the devastating floods in Pakistan in 2010 is becoming much more common, according to new scientific research.
Future crop production threatened by extreme heat — Last modified September 29, 2014 10:14
Uncertainties in the occurrence of heat stress under field conditions, plant responses to heat, and appropriate adaptation measures still need further investigation, say Stefan Siebert and Frank Ewert.
Reasons to Invest in Climate Change Adaptation in Africa — Last modified September 26, 2014 09:11
By Green Africa Directory on August 14, 2014 in Climate, Carbon & Renewable Energy
Stanford study shows effects of biomass burning on climate, health — Last modified August 17, 2014 16:23
Biomass burning – whether accidental wildfires or deliberate burning of forests to create agricultural lands – has long been known to affect both climate change and public health.
The interaction of climate change, fire, and forests in the U.S. — Last modified August 17, 2014 16:22
A special section of the September issue of Forest Ecology and Management, available online now, assesses the interactions among fire, climate change, and forests for five major regions of the United States.
Water vapour rise is due to man — Last modified August 17, 2014 16:20
Man-made greenhouse gases have increased the amount of water vapour in the upper troposphere, a team from the US has confirmed. The phenomenon could further amplify the effects of climate change, since water vapour also acts as a greenhouse gas.
Climate warming may not drive net losses of soil carbon from tropical forests — Last modified August 13, 2014 12:00
The planet's soil releases about 60 billion tons of carbon into the atmosphere each year, which is far more than that released by burning fossil fuels. This happens through a process called soil respiration. This enormous release of carbon is balanced by carbon coming into the soil system from falling leaves and other plant matter, as well as by the underground activities of plant roots.
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